QUALITIES OF ACADEMIC LANGUAGE

  • Vocab, terms, phrases, Morphology
    1. specific content language/language of the discipline (middle number, median, bar graph, data, greatest, least, fewest, range)
    2. general academic language (predict, strategy, solution)
  • Complex Sentence structure - clauses, phrases, tenses, voice, mood
  • Charts, diagrams, key
  • Text Structures: compare and contrast, make generalizations, describe, sequence, math
  • inferential language
  • connections- big gaps to fill in
  • mortar words
  • disconnected from familiar abstract

THINGS WE CAN SAY AND DO TO PROMOTE ACADEMIC LANGUAGE AND DEPTH OF UNDERSTANDING THROUGH MATH CONVERSATIONS


Things to Do
Things to Say
  1. Give students ample time to complet their thoughts.
  2. Have students explain their answers to a partner or in a small group.
  3. Insist on hands-down attention to the speaker.
  4. "Prompt, probe, and push" when someone answers, "I don't know."
  5. Anticipate the kinds of answers students will give.
  6. When a student has a wrong answer, ask about a contradiction.
  7. Track text (for younger students especially)
  8. Use gestures.
  9. Have students repeat academic words, phrases, and sentences.
  10. Paraphrase and explain academic vocabulary, phrases, and sentences.
  11. Show a target vocabulary word in a written sentence.
  12. Use the target vocabulary frequently; emphasize it when you use it.
  13. Use a sentence frame.
  14. Drop off your speech so students can finish sentences for you.
  15. Provide L1 support.
  16. Check for understanding with questions, student signals.
  17. Paraphrase students' answer to include academic language (if you think students can't do that for each other yet).
  18. Listen carefully to student answers.
  19. Pay attention to see if any students aren't responding and find some ways to include them.
  20. Tell your friend how you solved it.
  1. Can you tell me why you think that?
  2. How did you get that answer?
  3. How do you know that answer is reasonable?
  4. It's OK to change your mind, as long as you can say why you changed your mind.
  5. It's OK to make mistakes.
  6. Can you explain in your own words what Clive just explained?
  7. What is another way you could solve that problem?
  8. Can you explain that again? I don't understand. (ask for clarity)
  9. No, that's not right. Do you want to try again? (give a prompting question)
  10. That answer would be right if I asked about _,_ but I asked about . Try again?
  11. Tell your strategy.
  12. Solve the problem (first)
  13. Show how many strategies you can use (with a signal)
  14. Did you see what she saw? (whole group response)
  15. Asked one student if another student's answer is right (and why)
  16. Can you explain that again?
  17. Repeated and rephrased what students were saying
WHAT SHE DIDN'T SAY/DO:
  1. Didn't say one strategy was better than another one
  2. Didn't tell if an answer was right or wrong
  3. Didn't show them how to get an answer
  4. Didn't tell a student that his answer was wrong

ACADEMIC LANGUAGE IN SOCIAL STUDIES